Monday, July 17, 2017

Type 2 Diabetes, a Dietary Disease #389: Don’t go to THIS* hospital…

The draft title of this post was, “Don’t go to THIS* hospital for outpatient Type 2 diabetes care,” but space didn’t permit. The warning, however, stands. It will only cause you harm, and as Hippocrates said, “First, do no harm." Beware, therefore, of the clutches of THIS hospital outpatient department.
I discovered this while visiting my wife as she was recovering from successful back surgery (yeah!). I decided to check out the cafeteria and along the way saw signs for the Diabetes Care Center and decided to visit. The waiting room and reception station were empty, so I just gathered up all the free literature I could find.
There were four types available: 1) 2 3-fold 8½ x 11 glossy sheets promoting the hospital’s Diabetes Care Center, 2) 2 8½ by 11, 3-page, 2-sided color pages about “Healthy Eating” and food “Tips for People with Diabetes,” “brought to you by the AADE (American Association of Diabetes Educators), and “supported by an educational grant from Eli Lilly and Company,” a big pharma company that makes insulin, 3) 2 different 5 x 7 glossy magazines filled with diabetes drug advertisements, and 4) an educational flyer about injecting insulin.
Suffice it to say, the theme that dominated the “individualized” diabetes education program was drugs, specifically “initiation of insulin, instruction on blood sugar monitoring, insulin pump therapy, continuous glucose monitoring sensors, medical nutrition therapy and follow-up education.” But, those “individualized” therapies were the domain of the doctors and RNs. I was interested in seeing their advice for pre-diabetics.
One of the two hospital brochures addressed that. It said, “Dieticians who are Certified Diabetes Educators Serve as Resources,” both for “medical providers” [doctors and RNs] and for “participants” [diabetes patients]. For the diabetes educators’ advice I turned to the 3-page Xeroxed handouts on “Healthy Eating” and “Summer Fun and Food Tips for People with Diabetes.” And therein lies what I am warning you to avoid, like the plague.
Essentially, the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), the organization comprised of CDEs (Certified Diabetes Educators), espouses the same one-size-fits-all diet for pre-diabetics and diabetics (both type 1s and type 2s) that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2015) prescribe for everyone else in the U. S. over 2 years old: that is, “the plate method,” or in the “Summer Fun” version, “the paper plate plan”:
·          "Fill ½ the plate with non-starchy vegetables (such as greens, green beans, broccoli, cabbage)
·         ¼ should contain meat or other protein (fish, eggs, low-fat cheese, cottage cheese, beans or legumes)
·         ¼ contains starch (such as a potato or whole grain bread)
·         On the side, include an 8 ounce glass of low-fat milk or a small piece of fruit."
Also, you are reminded that a “healthy meal plan” should include “a limited amount of heart-healthy fats.” Examples given are oils and nuts, all high in unsaturated fats. Meats should be “lean” and cheeses “low-fat.” In other words, avoid as much as possible, red meat, saturated fats and dietary cholesterol. Straight from the “Guidelines.”
Your plate in this “healthy meal plan” is thus ¾'s carbohydrates. Doesn’t the AADE and their CDEs know that Type 2 diabetes is a dietary disease?!!! Apparently they do because elsewhere they want you to “count carbohydrates,” lose weight and exercise. But how are you going to do this on THIS meal plan, plus eating “small snacks between meals…to help keep your body going”? Answer: the hospital outpatient department will help you with 1) “emotional support,” 2) “empowerment,” and 3) “tools for self-care” (“education” and a meter). They will also supply you with oral medications (as needed, up to max dose in 3 different classes), then “initiation of insulin” [injections], insulin pump therapy, continuous glucose monitoring sensors, and eventually – and here’s an area where THIS hospital excels – they’ll help you with bariatric surgery.
* THIS hospital shall be nameless because this outpatient department for Type 2 Diabetes care is neither worse nor better than all the other hospital outpatient departments that deliver the establishment message about “Healthy Eating”. Here’s a clue though. A display in the main corridor proudly proclaims it is ranked among the best in the country for “Bariatric Surgery, Women’s Health and Heart Care.” Telling, isn’t it. Once they get you – the pre-diabetic or type 2 diabetic – in their clutches, you are destined to “progress” along this course: Your glucose disregulation will continue to deteriorate and your heart disease risk will continue to rise. Your Type 2 Diabetes will ipso facto be progressive on THIS “healthy meal plan.” Solution:  Just don’t go there? Don't be a "participant." This is sick care, not health care.

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Type 2 Diabetes, a Dietary Disease #388: “A Piece of Cake!”

Jason Fung’s recent post, “Towards a Cure©” must have garnered a lot of hits. Dr. Fung is a Toronto-based nephrologist with a busy clinical practice. In addition, his office operates in parallel an on-site and on-line clinic, Intensive Dietary Management (IDM), headed by Megan Ramos. Besides this, Dr. Fung blogs weekly under the aegis of the Institute of Kidney Life Science. He’s a busy guy. He is also a thinker whose hypotheses about the etiology and pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes are shaking things up a bit. It’s pretty exciting stuff.
In “Towards a Cure,” after a brief review of his hypothesis, he gets right to the point with these excerpts:
“The treatments that are known to lead to a cure – fasting, bariatric surgery and low carbohydrate diets – all share one feature in common. They are all treatments that lower insulin. Here’s comes the sudden, horrifying realization. The treatments we have been using for type 2 diabetes were EXACTLY wrong. Too much insulin causes this disease. Giving insulin or drugs that raise insulin will not make the disease better. It will only make it worse!
“This is precisely what happened. Type 2 diabetic patients are generally started on one medication at diagnosis. This only treats the symptoms, so over time the disease gets worse, and the dose is increased. Once the maximum dose is reached, a second, then a third drug is added. After that, insulin is prescribed in ever increasing doses in a desperate bid to control the blood sugar. But, if you require higher and higher doses of medications, your diabetes is not getter better, it is getting worse. The treatment was exactly wrong.
“In type 2 diabetes insulin levels are high, not low. Injecting more insulin is not going to help treat it. Yes, in the short-term, the symptom of high blood sugar is better, but the disease, the diabetes, was continually getting worse. How did we expect that giving more insulin to a patient with too much already would help? Our standard accepted treatments were precisely how NOT to treat type 2 diabetes.”
Of the 3 three treatments that “are known to lead to a cure,” bariatric surgery, which he is NOT advocating, is fraught with unnecessary risk. The other two, fasting (for which he is a strong proponent), and low or very low carbohydrate diets, are not risky…and they are patient controlled. You are in charge. You decide what to eat.
Jason Fung doesn’t have an editor (or a proof reader, apparently).  His posts frequently have typos. As my editor counseled me years ago, let a post percolate for a day and then edit it, and then edit it again the next day and the next. Jason Fung doesn’t have the luxury of time to do that. And neither does he have the benefit of an outside editor. For example, I would have counseled him to edit the penultimate sentence of the first paragraph above to read, “Giving insulin or eating foods that raise insulin will not make the disease better.”
I’m not nit-picking or carping really. Jason Fung is the most refreshing voice out there at the moment. And I think he has the best of all worlds. I’m jealous. He has his nephrology practice. He has a broad-reaching clinic focused on weight management and metabolic syndrome, including insulin resistance, pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. And he has his Institute in which, as a 1-man think tank he morphs into a research PI (Principal Investigator) each week. What fun! I think his blog title this week, “Towards a Cure,” is less a hook to garner internet hits than a reflection of his own excitement that he may just be on to something.
Maybe his weekly exercise in researching and writing is a ritual that is getting him closer to understanding why “(o)ver 50% of American adults are estimated to have prediabetes or diabetes,” as the lede of this week’s column states. Maybe as more people incorporate low carb or very low carb eating, and fasting, either intermittent or all-day fasting and very low carb eating as I do, it will also enable others to lose weight easily and without hunger, and greatly improve their general health too, as I have. Just maybe…
But that’s up to you. You are in charge of what and when you eat. You decide if you want to try it. I’ll tell you this much: Full-day fasting is easy, when you are KETO-ADAPTED. No hunger. Easy weight loss. “Piece of cake!”